Collaboration Projects

Sponsors: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment

The Center, drawing upon our Training Curriculum to Enhance the Effectiveness of Criminal Justice Teams, will deliver two one and a half day technical assistance and training events in Travis County, Texas and Marion County, Indiana, who have received funding from SAMHSA to implement/enhance reentry and drug court services. The overall purpose of each technical assistance event is threefold: (1) to familiarize participants with the research supporting collaboration as an effective process for achieving more successful criminal justice outcomes; (2) to assist them in identifying specific collaboration challenges within their reentry or drug court team; and (3) to provide them with tools, and help them develop strategies and action steps they can take to address them. Each technical assistance event will include interactive plenary sessions focused on various aspects of collaboration.

Sponsors: Colorado Collaborative Justice Conference

A Center staff member prepared and delivered a workshop session on “Criminal Justice in America – Collaboration as a Key to Success” and the closing plenary address on “the Role of Leadership in a Collaborative Organization” at the 2013 Colorado Collaborative Justice Conference.

Sponsors: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment

The Center developed an online module on partnerships and collaborations for use by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Criminal Justice Drug Court and Offender Reentry Program grantees. Center staff provided in-person and off-site support to SAMHSA in the development of the content framework/outline, the module and script content, and identification of appropriate activities, and interactions and/or knowledge checks for the module.

Sponsors: Missouri Office of State Courts Administrator

The Center developed a multidisciplinary training curriculum to enhance collaboration among circuit-based teams of Missouri juvenile and family court officials, child welfare personnel, and other agency professionals who are responsible for responding to and managing child abuse and neglect cases. The curriculum was designed to provide a structured forum in which team members can appreciate the complexity and challenges of working collaboratively in such cases; promote a common understanding of the various statutory requirements, agency mandates, and roles and responsibilities; increase stakeholders’ knowledge and awareness of specific factors associated with effective multidisciplinary teams; and create opportunities to foster and enhance collaboration through guided teamwork activities. The deliverables included a facilitator’s guide and participant materials for the series of curriculum modules, including the speaker’s notes, slides, handouts, activities and exercises, and additional reference/resource materials.

Sponsors: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Assistance

Under a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance, the Center enhanced the Collaborative Justice Web site (www.collaborativejustice.org/home.htm), developed previously through funding from the State Justice Institute and the National Institute of Corrections, by developing material specifically tailored to the needs of community corrections officials interested in forming multi-disciplinary, collaborative teams. The new Web pages contain, among other resources, tools and links to other project products that can offer solutions to the challenges encountered by community corrections professionals seeking to establish collaborative partnerships.

Sponsors: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Assistance

As a part of its leadership in the offender reentry area, the Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice, U.S. Department of Labor, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and their federal partners have created the Serious and Violent Offender Reentry Initiative (SVORI), a project designed to provide assistance to state and local agencies and other interested entities in improving the coordination and availability of programs and services for specific types of criminal offenders transitioning from institutional settings to the community. In order to support the ongoing, long-term efforts of SVORI grantees, the initiative’s federal partners sponsored an interactive, three-day training workshop in Washington, D.C. that focused specifically on collaboration for 44 jurisdictions. This workshop—which was offered five times—was designed and facilitated by the Center. Additionally, the Center assisted participating SVORI grant sites to establish or enhance multi-disciplinary statewide reentry policy efforts through on-site follow up technical assistance.

Although there is agreement in the criminal justice field that offender reentry initiatives can benefit from collaboration among the agencies and disciplines that share responsibility for working with offenders who are released into the nation’s communities, it is challenging for many jurisdictions to maximize their collaborative reentry efforts and maintain them over time. In order to support the ongoing, long-term efforts of the SVORI grantees, the initiative’s federal partners sponsored an interactive, three-day training workshop in Washington, D.C. that focused specifically on collaboration for 44 jurisdictions. This workshop—which was offered five times between May and July 2004—was designed and facilitated by the Center. Additionally, the Center assisted participating SVORI grant sites to establish or enhance multi-disciplinary statewide reentry policy efforts through on-site follow up technical assistance.

Sponsors: State Justice Institute U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Corrections

Created in October of 1998, this project was designed to address the need for a National Resource Center to support and enrich the efforts of state and local criminal justice professionals to establish or maintain collaborative strategies to prevent and reduce crime, make better use of system resources, and develop safer communities. Supported by several cooperating agencies in addition to the State Justice Institute (within the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, the Bureau of Justice Assistance, Drug Court Program Office, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Office for Victims of Crime, and Office on Violence Against Women), the Center provided intensive training and technical assistance to selected project sites engaged in collaborative efforts within their communities. The project developed a collaboration training curriculum designed to underscore the importance of clear vision and mission, and the critical role of multi–disciplinary teamwork in carrying out system change strategies. The project developed and disseminated information (including a series of articles on collaboration) to assist jurisdictions in establishing and institutionalizing a collaborative approach to criminal justice policy development work, drawing on both the body of research already available and the experiences of the sites receiving technical assistance through the project.

Sponsors: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Assistance

This project is providing technical assistance and training to five rural jurisdictions and tribal courts to assist them to achieve the level of partnership that they desire between the courts and criminal justice system, and the communities that they serve. This partnership aims to provide citizens with viable avenues of action and information as a means to build their communities, achieve greater safety, and combat their mistrust of the criminal justice system. It also seeks to provide agencies of the criminal justice system with opportunities to learn from and work with the citizens they are sworn to serve and protect.

The project will achieve its goals through three project phases, and various tasks, including:

  • Identifying mentor sites who have developed collaborative, community-oriented, problem-solving strategies to address the issues of crime and public safety;
  • Documenting the approaches used by the mentor sites;
  • Convening a symposium for teams from the mentor sites;
  • Providing ongoing technical assistance to the mentor sites;
  • Developing the capacity of the mentor sites to provide mentoring, training, and technical assistance for new sites; and
  • Producing a monograph for national distribution: Community Justice in Rural America: Four Examples and Four Futures.

Sponsors: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Assistance

This project supports the Bureau of Justice Assistance’s Community Prosecution Program by examining how improved partnerships between the police and prosecutors can significantly contribute to the creation of public safety. The project identified communities where the efforts of community policing, community prosecution, and community courts were well coordinated, and brought the lessons learned in these communities to a nationwide audience of police, prosecution, and court agencies. The Center provided training and technical assistance on effective police-prosecution partnerships to the Community Prosecution grantees, in conjunction with the training and technical assistance being provided by the Bureau of Justice Assistance’s Regional Leadership Sites. The project will also produce written materials that summarize the project’s findings, including recommendations for police and prosecutors about how to enhance their cooperation, information sharing, and problem-solving.